BOOCs Resources

The Benilde Open Online Course

This page is our official repository for mentorship resources and reference materials.

BOOCs 01

Empathy + Define

A Course on Humanity-Centered Design

The Benilde Prize mentoring program will take you on a journey of unraveling and understanding what it means to design for the good of humanity – the creation of solutions that are responsible, ethical, enriching, sustainable, and purpose-driven – using the lenses of the #4bottom line (people-planet-profit-purpose).

Design Thinking is the foundational tool used in Humanity-Centered Design.

Stakeholder Mapping – specific interest group(s) in the problem space and their roles (power relations)

Stakeholders or interest groups (politically correct) can be defined as:

  • A stakeholder is an individual or a group that claims to have one or more stakes in an organization.
  • Stakeholders may affect the organization and, in turn be affected by the organization’s actions, policies, practices and decisions. Carroll, A and Buchholtz, A.
  • A person, group, or organization that has direct or indirect stake in an organization because it can affect or be affected by the organization’s actions, objectives, and policies.
  • Parties with an interest in the execution and outcome of a project. They would include business streams affected by or dependent on the outcome.

(Source:What is a Stakeholder? – Definitions of a Stakeholder https://www.stakeholdermap.com/what-is-a-stakeholder.html)

Fig. 1 Sample stakeholder identification based on function

Distinguish between market, beneficiary, and/or user, direct and indirect, internal and external.  It is a must that social designers emapthize with all relevant interest groups based on topics or themes covered by the problem space. Below are examples on how teams can organize their listing of interest groups.

Fig. 2. Sample clustering of internal and external interest groups or stakeholders

To understand people and their connections,  kindly use this simple social innovation stakeholder canvas or People & Connections Map.  It has a very short clip on how to use the canvas.

Fig. 3.  People & Connections Map.  A canvas that allows social designers to identify interest groups / stockholders based on specific topics or stakes of interest around the problem space.

Below are links to other simple and downloadable templates and guides social designers can use in observing and interviewing people, providing scaffolds to assure underlying needs and values are uncovered. All templates offer a quick video reference on how to use it.

Persona building / Needs Assessment – get to know the people / interest groups you intend to work with, this will lead to generation of key insights

A Persona is defined as:

Fig. 4.  A Persona Canvas for a deep dive into understanding interest groups.

Systems Mapping – a systems mapping and understanding of the problem, understanding cause and effects, inter-relationships, and feedbacks. This is to make sure teams will not proceed to ideation phase with narrow understanding of the problem and its effects. This crucial step facilitates humanity-centered design and/or #4bottomlines.  

  • It is a must that a problem is first clearly identified, use the canvas on [Systems Mapping] Problem Definition

Fig. 5.  Problem Definition Canvas.

  • Next, social designers need to understand the context of these problems, thus it is important to identify and map out the drivers that affect the problem space and drivers that will bring about change.  Use the canvas on [Systems Mapping] Drivers of Change).

Fig. 6-7  Drivers of Change Canvas

Articulate the ‘How Might We’ (HMW) Problem Statement or the social designer ’s Point of View (POV)

It is the clear articulation of the problem from the point of view of the designer who empathized with a specific interest group and makes central the 4bottomline. For the projects to truly integrate and make central #4bottomline, it must be expressed first and foremost in the their HMW.

Use the POV Deconstruction guide below.


Fig. 8. What makes a great POV is that it is brief and insightful

BOOCs Overview

Intro to Design Thinking

Design Thinking is the iterative process of understanding different people and their contexts as the driver for creative problem solving.

Empathy

Take a deep dive in understanding different interest groups. Find out WHY they think, say, and do certain things. Discover what motivates certain people and how to leverage on these motivators. Plot your customer’s journey and discover the touchpoints to interact with them. See the value in asking the right questions.​

Define

Using data and conversations collected, identify and validate the real problem that needs to be solved. Be able to download, synthesize and find connections.​

BOOCs 02

Prototype

A Course on Humanity-Centered Design

The Benilde Prize mentoring program will take you on a journey of unraveling and understanding what it means to design for the good of humanity – the creation of solutions that are responsible, ethical, enriching, sustainable, and purpose-driven – using the lenses of the #4bottom line (people-planet-profit-purpose).

Design Thinking is the foundational tool used in Humanity-Centered Design.

  • Use the template Identifying Core Assumptions to finalise the core assumptions that your prototype will test. You will find it inside Step 1 folderHave this filled up template checked first with your online mentor before proceeding to Step 2. 
  • Refer to the following important articles and/or videos inside the Step 1 folder:
  • What do you want to find out about your idea?
  • Think of a question about how your prototype looks, feels, interacts, or works.  
  • What assumptions will you test and develop that will address how your prototype looks, feels, interacts, or works.

BOOCs Overview

Prototype

In this phase you’re going to quickly build a simple prototype of your idea. This makes it tangible and gives you something to test with the end-user.

Resources

Additional Resources

Human-Centered Design MINDSETS

HCD's Mindsets help you come up with innovations creatively by shaping how you think about design and approach problem solving.

Human-Centered Design METHODS

HCD's methods are step-by-step guides that help you unleash your creativity and keep your beneficiaries at the heart of the design process.

Design Thinking: Virtual Crash Course

Hit the ground running. Here is a 90-minute video-led cruise through d.school's methodology for Design Thinking.

The Field Guide to Human-Centered Design

HCD's Field Guide has everything you need to start solving problems like a truly human-centered designer.

Credits & Attribution:

  1. HCD Methods and Mindsets by IDEO’s Design Kit (DesignKit.org), 
  2. Acumen Course by NovoEd (Creative Commons license BY-NC-ND),
  3. HCD Field Guide by IDEO (Creative Commons License BY-NC-SA 3.0), and
  4. d.school’s Virtual Crash course © 2015 Stanford University Institute of Design